Quote of the week

English: Photograph of Henry James.

English: Photograph of Henry James. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

 

 

 

Summer afternoon-summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language.

Henry James

 

Quote of the week

 

English: Three quarter length portrait of Osca...

English: Three quarter length portrait of Oscar Wilde (en) by Napoleon Sarony (en) . 1 photographic print on card mount : albumen. Français : Portrait américain d’Oscar Wilde (fr) par Napoleon Sarony (fr) . Photographie albumen sur carton. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.

Oscar Wilde

Quote

Quote of the Week

The image of American Poet Laureate Howard Nem...

The image of American Poet Laureate Howard Nemerov (1920-1991) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The world is full of mostly invisible things,
And there is no way but putting the mind’s eye,
Or its nose, in a book, to find them out,
Things like the square root of Everest
Or how many times Byron goes into Texas,
Or whether the law of the excluded middle
Applies west of the Rockies.

Howard NemerovTo David, About His Education

Quote of the week

Ralph Waldo Emerson, ca. 1857

Ralph Waldo Emerson, ca. 1857 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The sun shines and warms and lights us and we have no curiosity to know why this is so; but we ask the reason of all evil, of pain, and hunger, and mosquitoes and silly people.

 –Ralph Waldo Emerson

Quote of the week

Pico Mosagre walk (Parque Natural de Ponga)

Pico Mosagre walk (Parque Natural de Ponga) (Photo credit: Larra Jungle Princess)

What is this life if, full of care,

we have no time to stand and stare?

-W.H.Davies, Leisure

Quote of the Week

English: A cabinet card copy of a daguerreotyp...

English: A cabinet card copy of a daguerreotype of Emily Dickinson (unauthenticated) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A word is dead

when it is said,

some say.

I say it just

begins to live

that day.

Emily Dickinson

Quote of the Week

English: Bust of Socrates in the Vatican Museum

English: Bust of Socrates in the Vatican Museum (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“If all our misfortunes were laid in one common heap, whence everyone must take an equal portion, most people would be content to take their own and depart.”

–Socrates

This quote seemed particularly appropriate for me at this point. I have no doubt that the problems my family has faced for the past few months are easier than the problems many other families face. It is helpful to remember that we all have our challenges.

 

Quote of the week

“You will see that Charles set his sights high. Intelligent idlers always have, in order to justify their idleness to their intelligence.”

–John Fowles, The French Lieutenant’s Woman

 

Quote of the Week

Portrait of John Locke, by Sir Godfrey Kneller...

Portrait of John Locke, by Sir Godfrey Kneller. Oil on canvas. 76×64 cm. Britain, 1697. Source of Entry: Collection of Sir Robert Walpole, Houghton Hall, 1779. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but because they are not already common.”

John Locke, Essay Concerning Human Understanding

Quote of the Week

Portrait of Jane Austen, from the memoir by J....

Portrait of Jane Austen, from the memoir by J. E. Austen-Leigh. All other portraits of Austen are generally based on this, which is itself based on a sketch by Cassandra Austen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“She had been forced into prudence in her youth, she learned romance as she grew older- the natural sequence of an unnatural beginning.”

-Jane Austen, Persuasion

 

This quote so perfectly describes me that I had to choose it. I didn’t learn romance the way she means; I’m married to the man I was dating when I was 20. I did follow the prudent path, in choosing be a doctor, when I was younger and only came around to dreaming as I grew older. (Granted, if I didn’t have a husband to help me with such luxuries as food and shelter, I’d still be following the prudent path- I haven’t changed THAT much!) It’s a popular notion that we’re irresponsible dreamers when we’re young and learn responsibility and prudence through experience. Some of us, though, are perhaps TOO responsible in youth and need experience and age to learn to take a chance and follow the riskier path. We all know the risks of too little caution. I think we can forget the risks of too much of it.

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